This was always going to be a grandly proportioned kitchen for designer Luke Beveridge to work on. For a start the client, who is a passionate art collector looking to take on new ideas and materials, told him to think on a big scale. ‘With the centrepiece island I was creating a state-ofthe- art piece of furniture and the space also needed to be gallery-like to hang her paintings.’ Luke wasn’t restrained by the standard requirements of a single multifunctional layout either, and was tasked to create two separate kitchens in tandem. ‘One was designed to be practical and everyday,’ he explains. ‘The other was a show kitchen to work as a family hub and entertaining area.’

 

 

To achieve the grand dimensions and cutting-edge look DesignSpace London had to find a material that was up to the job. ‘We chose to use our latest product for the cabinetry which is an anodised black aluminium. It’s a lightweight material with a honeycomb core that gives it strength and flexibility to create incredibly wide 1.5 metre drawers. We don’t get the opportunity to work with such a luxurious and high quality product often, probably in only about three or four projects a year,’ Luke says.

 

The 10mm thick doors are unique to the DesignSpace London Modulnova Blade collection. ‘The cabinetry comes in a variety of metallic finishes including bronze and titanium but for this particular kitchen we went for the black aluminum to achieve that lovely understated finish to focus on the linear design,’ says Luke. ‘In contrast, and to soften the strong lines of the cabinetry, we used horizontal and vertical veneer planes to frame the blank wall. It provides an ideal back drop to focus on the artwork.’ The finished kitchen is a stunning illustration of how contemporary kitchen design, using the latest innovations in materials, has created a magnificent space which works for family living too.

 

 

Anodised aluminium with a bespoke black finish from the Modulnova Blade kitchen collection, made to order by DesignSpace London. Kitchens from £25,000.

 

Photos by Anthony Parkinson

 

Article by: Sally Smith